We are celebrating 40 years in 2019!

The Timber Tamers are a large general 4wd club based out of Western Washington. We were organized in April of 1979, and are based out of the Lynnwood, Washington area. Our membership is diverse, from young to old, men and women, driving many different types of 4wd vehicles.

We are affiliated with the Pacific Northwest 4 Wheel Drive Association and promote TREAD Lightly! principles. The PNW4WDA organizes trail runs, trail maintenance in conjunction with DNR, races, play days, fun days, clean-ups, charitable works, legislative issues, etc., in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.

Amazon Smile

Did you know that the Tamers are a non-profit organization? Because of this the Tamers are eligible to participate in the Amazon Smile program. If you make a purchase on Amazon and specify the Tamers as a non-profit that you would like to donate to, then Amazon will donate a small portion of the proceeds from the purchase to the Tamers. If you are interested in helping to support the Tamers please click on the following link to donate via Amazon Smile.

Latest Posts

Walker Valley Work Party Nov 2019

Well, it was the second Saturday of the month, so it must be time for a Walker Valley Work Party. (And it was!!!) This was a special one, because we made plans with Jim Cahill (from DNR) to repair and re-set the kiosk at the gate for our namesake Timber Tamer trails. As it turned out, we’d had about the driest early November on record with no rain at all since before Halloween. Of course, since we had trail work to do today, today was the day for that to change, so we had our more typical November

Club Run to Reiter Oct 2019

At the Timber Tamer’s Club Meeting 2 days prior, we asked about the club trail run for this month. Since several members of our club already had plans to attend Steve Y’s birthday party Saturday evening, it just made sense to have our trail run at Reiter—since it’s only 10 minutes from Steve and Jamie’s home! First was the question of who was planning to go on the trail run, and about 8 hands went up. Second was the question of who was going to lead the trail run. Predictably, all 8 hands